Common Questions

Starting the journey to mental health treatment can often be unclear and confusing. This section is designed to help answer common questions my clients ask.

HOW DO I CHOOSE BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL, COUPLE, OR FAMILY THERAPY?

As you may have already noticed, there is significant overlap between couple therapy, family therapy, and individual therapy in terms of the range of conditions each service can effectively address. Your treatment type depends on multiple factors such as your comfortability, personal preference and specific issue. Personally, I find that therapy that involves multiple people in a person's system brings a richer therapy experience and more swift results. 

HOW MUCH DO SESSIONS COST?

  • $120 initial consult and follow-up sessions

  • Payment can be paid in cash, check, or credit card (MasterCard or Visa).

  • I offer a sliding scale on a limited basis and a reduced fee for full-time students; please do not hesitate to contact me if you need your fee adjusted.

DO YOU TAKE INSURANCE?

I am not accepting insurance at this time. Clients who wish to seek reimbursement should call their insurance company directly to inquire about coverage for routine outpatient psychotherapy for out-of-network providers.

WHAT IS YOUR CANCELLATION POLICY?

Kindly inform me within 24 hours of your scheduled appointment if you are unable to make the session. Appointments canceled in less than 24 hours will be charged the standard session fee.

WHAT IS EMOTIONALLY FOCUSED COUPLES THERAPY (EFT)?

EFT is an evidence-based treatment for couple distress offering significant rates of improvement. EFT works to help partners bond through expressing emotional needs and promoting relational attunement. EFT can also help individuals and families by assisting them in fostering healthy attachment and more secure bonds. To learn more about EFT and its research please visit: http://www.iceeft.com/index.php/about-us/what-is-eft

IS THERAPY REALLY CONFIDENTIAL?

Confidentiality is extremely important and you have a right to privacy concerning your mental health/medical information. I am mandated by law to disclose certain information in certain situations, which include the following:

1. If you disclose information to me that causes me to suspect that a child has been abused physically, abused sexually, exploited sexually, neglected, or endangered, I must report that information to Child Protective Services or law enforcement.

2. If you disclose information that causes me to suspect that an elder or a dependent adult has been abused physically, abused sexually, exploited sexually, neglected, abused financially, abandoned, isolated, or abducted, I am required by law to report that information to Adult Protective Services, law enforcement, and/or other governmental entities.

3. If you communicate to me a serious threat of physical violence against a reasonably identifiable victim(s), and I believe you have a firearm or other deadly weapon, I am required to report that information to law enforcement.

4. If a court, board, commission, or administrative agency compels me to disclose your medical information, I must comply with such order.

5. If a search warrant lawfully issued to a governmental law enforcement agency compels me to disclose your medical information, I must comply with such warrant.

6. If otherwise specifically REQUIRED by law.

HOW IS A MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPIST UNIQUE?

Marriage and family therapists are uniquely qualified in the assessment and treatment of individuals, couples, families, and groups. Marriage and family therapists have a core understanding about the couple and family system and are required to have met educational and clinical hour requirements working with couples, families, and children in order to practice. In the state of California, mental health professionals (at any level) cannot call themselves marriage and family therapists unless they have met these requirements and are registered or licensed as a marriage and family therapist.

IS THERE A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY?

The terms are essentially interchangeable in most clinical contexts, however, there are some exceptions. Someone who calls themselves a psychotherapist must be at least a masters-level mental health practitioner with a clinical license or registration to practice. 

I warmly invite you to contact me if you have any other inquiries about my services or about how a psychotherapist can help you. 

 

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